Fightin’ Words: Kentucky vs. Louisville

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More than 100 years ago, the University of Kentucky and the University of Louisville met for the first time on the basketball court. More than 30 years ago, the intrastate rivals faced each other in the original “Dream Game.” Fightin’ Words has the inside stories of these games and others from the rivalry, as well as tales of how Louisville coach Denny Crum out-recruited Joe B. Hall for the athletes in inner-city Louisville; how Rick Pitino had a dominant tenure at UK, then left to become the Cardinals’ coach; how John Calipari brought UK back on top; and much more.

The book covers everything from the 12 games between the rivals before the 1983 game, the 24-year buildup (and 61 years since the last regular season matchup) to the 1983 game and how it finally became an annual rivalry, and then individual chapters for the 31 UK/UL games since. Each chapter contains pregame analysis, game coverage, and postgame discussion, with firsthand interviews from players involved. The authors reveal the effects of each game on both teams and on the history of college basketball

 

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4 comments
James D Murphy
James D Murphy

Ky. Fans aren't bias when their record against the dirty birds stands on it's on.

Tom Gribbins
Tom Gribbins

Doesn't say who is the writer, if its anyone from Louisville, and or Lexington, it will be filled with bias opinions...There is nothing worse than that of a UofL fan trying to tell something about Kentucky..On the other hand, it goes the same way, when UK fan tries to tell something about UofL....There in no way in hell, a fan of either school can write a book, and be non bias and fair to both schools....The fans of each are suckers, and buy this stuff up, and there are hundreds of people out there getting rich off these two fan bases.....

JoeCox1
JoeCox1

What if you are a fan of one... and an alum of the other? I challenge you, Tom. Read the book. If you think it was biased, for goodness sake, tell me where. It's a history book, not an opinion book. And the history is, for the most part, what it is.